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Neck-to-Body Joint

Neck-to-Body Joint

by Garth Fleming

Originally published in Guild of American Luthiers Data Sheet #74, 1978 and Lutherie Woods and Steel String Guitars, 1998

 

This method of joining the neck to the body was discovered by a violinmaker friend and is effective and reasonably easy to cut. It’s basically a straight mortise and tenon joint with an angle (a) added, which gives it a locking effect like a dovetail joint. The sides of the tenon are cut and the angle a is cut. If a tight fit is managed with the female section in the heel block, it makes a reliable joint.

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Transducers

Transducers

by Reagan Cole

Originally published as Guild of American Luthiers Data Sheet #54, 1977



The purpose of this particular article is to project one man’s opinion about the theoretical whys and wherefores of the transducer for acoustic instruments. This is not a consumer’s report analysis of commercially available products. Anyone interested in this information may consult the series which is currently running in Mugwumps Instrument Herald. A full market report and commentary has been promised. I have never had the money to run out and A-B all the stuff that crops up in the pages of Guitar Player; anyway, I have never used any of the commercial units since I build my own systems.

There seems to be several major camps regarding the amplification of acoustic instruments. These I would categorise as follows: (1) Only microphones should be used. These devices are, after all, an electrical analogue to the human ear, so if the mike is good all will be well. Absolutely nothing should be attached to an existing acoustic instrument. (2) Transducers are a necessary evil. They do allow musicians playing acoustic instruments to compete in an electric or an electronic ensemble. At any rate, if they are used they should be easily removable, leaving no trace. (3) The acoustic-electric is yet another evolutionary phase. The performance of the instrument transducer system is of paramount importance; It may be necessary to modify the instrument or even to design a new type for acoustic-electric use. I don’t believe that there are grounds for a serious feud lurking in any of these arguments; all are correct from their own frames of reference.

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Lutherie Binge?

Lutherie Binge?

by Dake Traphagen

Originally published in Guild of American Luthiers Quarterly, 5, #4, 1977



Well somehow I’ve survived my first but not last, European experience, which Tim Olsen dubbed a “Lutherie Binge” in Vol. 5, No. 2. From my perspective, I think the phraseology could be better put as a Life Experience Binge. After all, let’s not limit ourselves to being only luthiers; or at least if we want to view ourselves as being luthiers, let’s expand the term to encompass all other experiences which connect ourselves to our Luthiership.

So what about my European Experience? Ten hour jet flight, what a slow method of transportation; Galliards of royalty traversing the English countryside. While resting in the dark forest; was that a Hobbit or maybe an elf?

The Mediterranean’s salty, yet beautiful swimming; but where were the troubadour guitarists of Spain: only me expectations? A lot of flamboyant people and machine guns however... Majestic, cultured, the arts of Arts of western conception, if only one wouldn’t be so coined American; such is the way Paris... Oh yes! The ferry’s cooling rushing air and rolling boat with rain, sun, spray, and lovely people enjoying; except for a few green faces, but who knows, maybe they enjoyed being green.

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This article is part of our premium web content offered to Guild members. To view this and other web articles, join the Guild of American Luthiers. Members also receive 4 annual issues of American Lutherie and get discounts on products. For details, visit the membership page.

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