Posted on

Spray Gun Agitator

Spray Gun Agitator

by Jimmie Van

Originally published in Guild of American Luthiers Data Sheet #91, 1978

 

A new product that I found to be most helpful when spraying a finish or other things that had to be in complete suspension to assure uniform coverage, is a agitator siphon cup assemble sold by N.A.P.A. auto part stores. This cup will work on most major brand guns. The 1 quart cup provides constant agitation from air right off of the same line that your gun works off of, no extra line is needed. You can control the mixing speeds of the agitator, and does not require an extra cleaning. The part number you need to ask for is model 70-707. This may be of big help to those of you who do a lot of finishing work.

Posted on

Neck-to-Body Joint

Neck-to-Body Joint

by Garth Fleming

Originally published in Guild of American Luthiers Data Sheet #74, 1978 and Lutherie Woods and Steel String Guitars, 1998

 

This method of joining the neck to the body was discovered by a violinmaker friend and is effective and reasonably easy to cut. It’s basically a straight mortise and tenon joint with an angle (a) added, which gives it a locking effect like a dovetail joint. The sides of the tenon are cut and the angle a is cut. If a tight fit is managed with the female section in the heel block, it makes a reliable joint.

Posted on

Transducers

Transducers

by Reagan Cole

Originally published as Guild of American Luthiers Data Sheet #54, 1977



The purpose of this particular article is to project one man’s opinion about the theoretical whys and wherefores of the transducer for acoustic instruments. This is not a consumer’s report analysis of commercially available products. Anyone interested in this information may consult the series which is currently running in Mugwumps Instrument Herald. A full market report and commentary has been promised. I have never had the money to run out and A-B all the stuff that crops up in the pages of Guitar Player; anyway, I have never used any of the commercial units since I build my own systems.

There seems to be several major camps regarding the amplification of acoustic instruments. These I would categorise as follows: (1) Only microphones should be used. These devices are, after all, an electrical analogue to the human ear, so if the mike is good all will be well. Absolutely nothing should be attached to an existing acoustic instrument. (2) Transducers are a necessary evil. They do allow musicians playing acoustic instruments to compete in an electric or an electronic ensemble. At any rate, if they are used they should be easily removable, leaving no trace. (3) The acoustic-electric is yet another evolutionary phase. The performance of the instrument transducer system is of paramount importance; It may be necessary to modify the instrument or even to design a new type for acoustic-electric use. I don’t believe that there are grounds for a serious feud lurking in any of these arguments; all are correct from their own frames of reference.

Become A Member to Continue Reading This Article

This article is part of our premium web content offered to Guild members. To view this and other web articles, join the Guild of American Luthiers. Members also receive 4 annual issues of American Lutherie and get discounts on products. For details, visit the membership page.

If you are already a member, login for access or contact us to setup your account.