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Cleaning Shop, Part 2

Cleaning Shop, Part 2

by John Calkin

Published online by Guild of American Luthiers, April 2022

see also,
Cleaning Shop Part 1 by John Calkin

 

There aren’t many scraps in a guitar shop that are useful for making guitars. What guitarmaker would throw those out? But if you scale down to flat-back mandolins or ukuleles you can make use of a lot of expensive material that would otherwise end up in a landfill. The wood I threw out in Cleaning Shop Part 1 was wood I thought I wouldn’t live long enough to use. I had no one to pass it on to. After working for Huss & Dalton for 19 years and more than 4000 guitars I had a crazy amount of scraps. The material I still have should keep me working on my own for years to come.

Quartersawn spruce and cedar strips for center seam back grafts. All photos by John Calkin.
Fingerboard cut-offs for banjo tailpieces, heel caps, inlays, etc.
Rosewood aplenty for headstock caps, inlays, heel caps, laminated fingerboards and bridges.
Material for back grafts and end grafts.
Neck stock. (The fingerboards didn’t come from anyone’s scrap pile.)
Spruce and mahogany ukulele tops and backs. Mahogany for uke sides comes from the neck stock.
More fingerboard cut-offs, good for fingerboard bindings and laminated bridges.
Just to present ideas, these ukulele or mandolin fretboards were laminated from mahogany and rosewood.
A banjo tailpiece.
Unfinished boxes made of mahogany, rosewood, and ebony. What? You don’t make crafty gifts and stuff in your shop?

see also,
Cleaning Shop Part 1 by John Calkin